Katy, Texas

Katy is a city in the U.S. state of Texas, within the Houston–The Woodlands–Sugar Land metropolitan area. The city is approximately centered at the tripoint of Harris, Fort Bend, and Waller counties. Katy had a population of 14,102 at the 2010 census, up from 11,775 in 2000. Its population was estimated at 21,729 in 2019.




First formally settled in the mid-1891s, Katy was a railroad town along the Missouri–Kansas–Texas (MKT) Railroad which ran parallel to U.S. Route 90 (today Interstate 10) into Downtown Houston.




The fertile floodplain of Buffalo Bayou, which has its source near Katy, and its tributaries made Katy and other communities in the surrounding prairie an attractive location for rice farming.




Beginning in the 1960s, the rapid growth of Houston moved westward along the new Interstate 10 corridor, bringing Katy into its environs. Today, the municipality of Katy lies at the center of a broader area known as Greater Katy, which has become heavily urbanized.




While largely subsumed into Greater Houston, the town of Katy is still notable for Katy Mills Mall, the Katy Independent School District, and its historic town square along the former right-of-way of the MKT railroad.




History
In the early 1800s Katy was known as "Cane Island", named for the creek that runs through the area, a branch of Buffalo Bayou. The creek was filled with tall cane, not native to the area.




It was presumed to have been planted by either the Karankawa Indians or Spanish explorers to aid in fur trapping until the 1820s.




In 1845 James J. Crawford received a land grant that included this area. The hot summers and thick clay soil made it difficult to attract settlers to the area. Crawford, Peter Black, John Sills and the families of former slaves Thomas (Mary) Robinson and Milto McGinnis were the only recorded residents of Cane Island in 1875.




In 1895, James Oliver Thomas laid out a town, and in January 1896 the town of Katy was named through Thomas's post office application. The name "Katy" was derived from the MKT Railroad Company, which was commonly referred to as "the K-T" (also its stock exchange symbol). This common designation soon evolved into "the Katy."




The anticipations of prosperity would bring growth to the new town which was developed around the original train stop and railroad tracks. By the early 1900s many families had come by train and wagon to establish Katy.




Cotton and peanuts and corn were the first successful crops, but rice soon became the primary commodity crop. Katy later became known for rice farming; the first concrete rice driers in the state of Texas were built here in 1944 and still stand as landmarks.




The farming community well supported local businesses as several hotels, stores, livery stables and saloons were prospering.




On September 8, 1900, the town's early efforts were swept clean by the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the deadliest hurricane in US history. All but two of the original Katy homes were lost in the storm. Despite this, Cane Island rebuilt and continued to grow.




In 1945 the city of Katy was incorporated as a municipality. C. L. Baird was the first mayor. Boundaries were determined by finding the area that contained the most residents and was reasonably sized so that it could be managed by city services.




The construction and opening of Interstate 10 in 1966 allowed for rapid development of the area, as Houston expanded westward. This section was widened in 2008 to an average of 26 lanes, and in some areas 30 lanes total including 6 feeder and 4 HOV lanes for roughly 22 miles, making it the widest Freeway in the world.




The population was 9,866 in 1988, 8,005 in 1990, 11,775 in 2000, and 15,591 in 2014. Currently Katy has grown to a population of well over 16,000 residents and almost 270,000 in the Greater Katy area.




Katy has won national accolades for growth and sustainability.[6] including the Gadberry Group naming Katy as one of "9 from 2009" most notable high-growth areas in the United States.




Recently, Katy, Texas has grown a strong presence in the hip hop community. On May 1, 2020, Aubrey "Drake" Graham, rapper and Toronto native released his unexpected mixtape, "Dark Lane Demo Tapes". Filled with leaked songs and internet snippets, the project is littered with references to American and Canadian areas.




One of the most streamed songs, "Desires" featuring long-time friend and artist Nayvadius "Future" Wilburn, actually makes a direct reference to the city,




"I should have put you somewhere where no one could find you Mansion out in the sticks with nothin' around you Katy, Texas, Dallas, Texas You know, a different environment"




Speaking directly to the removed nature of Katy, the song pays respect to the beautiful mansions and expansive acres that are synonymous with the community.




Map of Katy, Texas.

Geography
The city of Katy is located at the three-border intersection of Harris, Fort Bend, and Waller counties, along Interstate 10, 29 miles (47 km) west of downtown Houston and 22 miles (35 km) east of Sealy. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city of Katy has a total area of 11.3 square miles (29.3 km2), of which 11.2 square miles (29.1 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2), or 0.38%, is water.




Katy is often further defined as either "Old Towne Katy" or "Greater Katy". "Old Towne Katy" refers to the proper of Katy, which was incorporated in 1945.




Its boundaries, as defined by the Katy Independent School Divisions zoning, runs just south of Kingsland Blvd, stretching across Interstate 10 to Morton Road. Katy Fort Bend Road and Cane Island Creek act as the east and west boundaries, The "Greater Katy" area includes the city of Katy plus large sections of unincorporated land surrounding the city corresponding to the boundaries of the 181 sq mi (470 km2) Katy Independent School District.




The "All Aboard Katy!" public art project and the Katy Area Economic Development Council's "Energy Grows Here" branding initiative are large-scale projects launched to help promote, identify and unite the Katy area.




Greater Katy includes communities such as Cinco Ranch, Green Trails, Grayson Lakes, Seven Meadows, Pine Mill Ranch, Silver Ranch, Firethorne, Grand Lakes and Cane Island.




It also encompasses suburban developments from the 1970s and 1980s, such as Memorial Parkway, Kelliwood and Nottingham Country.




Old Towne Katy's new upscale communities include Pin Oak Village, The Falls at Green Meadows and The Enclave. Large developments underway include a new residential community boarding the east border of Mary Joe Peckham Park and the anticipated Katy Boardwalk.




The City of Katy has recently placed a large focus on the downtown redevelopment plan which includes the new City Hall Building and an upcoming Downtown green space. Further projects include the Katy Museum of Modern Art's new building, Typhoon Texas Water Park, Katy Independent School District's Legacy Football Stadium, Katy Independent School District's Rhodes Stadium, Momentum Indoor Climbing Center, REI Climb Store and the YMCA at Katy Main Street. Large road improvements are underway in Downtown, on Morton Road and Franz Road.




The city of Houston's extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ) stretches well west of Katy. This means that most of the unincorporated lands in the Katy area may be annexed by the city of Houston at some time in the future. The city of Katy's ETJ, meanwhile, is limited to parcels of land west and north of the city itself.




Climate
The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Katy has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.




Demographics
Historical population
Census---Pop.----------%±
1950-----849 ---------- —
1960----1,569---------84.8%
1970----2,923---------86.3%
1980----5,660---------93.6%
1990----8,005---------41.4%
2000---11,775---------47.1%
2010---14,102---------19.8%
Est. 2019-21,729-------54.1%

U.S. Decennial Census
As of the census of 2000, there were 11,775 people in "Old Katy", 3,888 households, and 3,083 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,103.7 people per square mile (426.1/km²). There were 4,072 housing units at an average density of 381.7 per square mile (147.3/km²).




The racial makeup of the city was 83.98% White, 4.24% African American, 0.56% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 8.65% from other races, and 2.03% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 23.75% of the population.




There were 3,888 households out of which 45.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.9% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.7% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.00 and the average family size was 3.37.




In the city, the population was spread out with 31.5% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 8.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.5 males.




The median income for a household in the city was $51,111, and the median income for a family was $57,741. Males had a median income of $38,412 versus $33,004 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,192. 8.4% of the population and 7.0% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 9.1% were under the age of 18 and 6.5% were 65 or older.




To learn more about #KatyTexas, visit Wikipedia.

Katy, Texas

Katy is a city in the U.S. state of Texas, within the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land metropolitan area. The city is approximately centered at the tripoint of Harris, Fort Bend, and Waller counties. Katy had a population of 14,102 at the 2010 census, up from 11,775 in 2000.

Tags: