Kacee has been found safe

UPDATE: Kacee has been found safe. Original alert is below.


MANISTEE, MICHIGAN. MARCH 22, 2020. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Police in Michigan are asking for the help of the public in locating a woman who went missing last week. 20 year old Kacee Hogsett was last seen on March 15, 2020 in Manistee, Michigan.



Kacee is registered as a missing adult with the Michigan State Police.



Kacee is described as a white with female red/auburn hair and hazel eyes. Kacee stands 5'4" tall and weighs about 126 pounds.



The map above is where Kacee was last seen.



Authorities report that Kacee was last seen at the Days Inn in Manistee, Michigan and was possibly headed for Kalamazoo, Michigan.



The-information-in-this-alert-comes-from-law-enforcement-agencies



A last seen clothing description was not available at the time of this missing person report.



If you have five seconds, please share this post on social media, make the post public, and use the hashtag #FindKaceeHogsett so that the alert can go viral. You never know. You might just save a life.



If you have seen Kacee or have any information her, please contact Trooper Andrew Jared with the Michigan State Police at (231) 779-6040 and reference case number 71-1279-20.



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Additional information about this case is updated at the bottom of this page.


According to Wikipedia, Missing Persons in the United States is a growing concern.


In the United States, 800,000 children were going missing annually according to a 2002 government study.


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These figures have been widely circulated in the popular press.


As the findings from the 2002 Second National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children study summary by the US Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) indicate, a child can be missing for many reasons, including "Nonfamily abductions", "Family abductions," "Runaway/thrownaway episodes," "Missing involuntary, lost, or injured events," and "Missing benign explanation situations."


NISMART–2 defined a missing child both with regard to children who were missing from their caretakers, and children who were missing from their caretakers and reported to an agency for assistance locating the missing children.


NISMART–2 considered a child as missing "when the child experienced a qualifying episode during which the child's whereabouts were unknown to the primary caretaker, with the result that the caretaker was alarmed for at least 1 hour and tried to locate the child.


For an episode to qualify, the child had to be younger than 18 and the situation had to meet the specific criteria for one of the [above] NISMART–2 episode types."


The study was based on data derived from four NISMART–2 studies – a Law Enforcement Study, National Household Surveys of both Adult Caretakers and Youth (using computer-aided telephone interviewing methodology), and a Juvenile Facilities Study.


The study summary noted that "it is important to recognize that nearly all of the caretaker missing children (1,312,800 or 99.8 percent) were returned home alive or located by the time the study data were collected.



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Only a fraction of a percent (0.2 percent or 2,500) of all caretaker missing children had not returned home or been located, and the vast majority of these were runaways from institutions.


The United States' National Crime Information Center (NCIC) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, mandated by the National Child Search Assistance Act, maintains its own "Missing Person File" to which local police report people for whom they are searching.


The NCIC "Missing Person File" does have a category that is entitled "Juvenile" or "EMJ", but that category does not reflect the total number of all juveniles reported missing to the NCIC, for whom local police are searching.


The NCIC also uses its own classification criteria; it does not use the above NISMART definitions of what constitutes a missing child.


The NCIC data is limited to individuals who have been reported to the NCIC as missing, and are being searched for, by local police.


In addition, the EMJ category does not contain all reports of juveniles who have been reported missing to the NCIC.


While the EMJ category holds records of some of the juveniles reported missing, the totals for the EMJ category excludes those juveniles recorded missing but who "have a proven physical or mental disability ... are missing under circumstances indicating that they may be in physical danger ... are missing after a catastrophe ... [or] are missing under circumstances indicating their disappearance may not have been voluntary".


In 2013, the NCIC entered 445,214 "EMJ" reports (440,625 in the EMJ category under the age of 18; but 462,567 under the age of 18 in all categories, and 494,372 under the age of 21 in all categories), and NCIC's total reports numbered 627,911.


Of the children under age 18, a total of 4,883 reports were classified as "missing under circumstances indicating that the disappearance may not have been voluntary, i.e., abduction or kidnapping" (9,572 under age 21), and an additional 9,617 as "missing under circumstances indicating that his/her physical safety may be in danger" (15,163 under age 21).


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The total missing person records entered into NCIC were 661,593 in 2012, 678,860 in 2011 (550,424 of whom were under 21), 692,944 in 2010 (531,928 of whom were under 18, and 565,692 of whom were under 21), and 719,558 in 2009.


A total of 630,990 records were cleared or canceled during 2013.


At end-of-year 2013, NCIC had 84,136 still-active missing person records, with 33,849 (40.2%) being of juveniles under 18, and 9,706 (11.5%) being of juveniles between 18 and 20.


Third parties are also available in the United States, but can be expensive yielding limited results. These resources are in the form of bounty hunters and private investigators.


* * * * * * *Information-courtesy


The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs)

By bringing people, information, forensic science and technology together, NamUs helps resolve cases.